Making Bone Broth: Chicken, Turkey or Beef


Bone Broths

According to some reputable sources, these are SUPER healthy broths that will provide many health benefits.

One of my favorite go-to guys is Dr. Mercola. Click here for Dr. Mercola’s thoughts on the benefits of homemade bone broths. He states, “Broth or stock plays an important role as it’s easily digestible, helps heal the lining of your gut, and contains valuable nutrients.”

Consuming bone broth can speed up the healing process from a cold or illness. Author of Gut And Pyschology Syndrome (The GAPS Diet) Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride states, “Bone broth is excellent for “healing and sealing” your gut”.

Sally Fallon, a co-author of the popular “Nourishing Traditions” cookbook says, “Stock contains minerals in a form the body can absorb easily—not just calcium but also magnesium, phosphorus, silicon, sulfur and trace minerals. It contains the broken down material from cartilage and tendons–stuff like chondroitin sulphates and glucosamine, now sold as expensive supplements for arthritis and joint pain.”  

Sally Fallon also wrote this article “Broth is Beautiful” for the Weston Price Foundation.

 


 

Making Chicken or Turkey Broth

Ingredients:

  • Organic, pasture raised chicken or turkey  (whole or parts, + leftover long bones (legs), or just some meaty bones, the carcass and gizzards)
  • Optional: add onions, garlic, and celery if desired for more flavor
  • Clean filtered water to fill pot about 3/4 full (1/2 – 3/4 gallon or so)

Directions:

  1. Bring to a boil and reduce heat to low and simmer with cover for about 2 – 2 1/2 hours.
  2. Remove meat and return bones and add more water to simmer on low for approximately 3-4 more hours, checking to be sure the water/broth level is at least covering the bone(s)… about 3/4 full.
  3. Remove bones and put broth in jars. Keeps in the fridge about 5-6 days.

 

Alternately, if you don’t have a lot of time to watch over this process:

  1. Put it all into a crockpot on the high setting overnight or when you head out for work in the morning. Be sure to have the water level at about 3/4 full.

IMG_6466

 

TIP: You can let it cool and freeze portions in quart or pint sized jars*, OR you can freeze in ice cube trays (once frozen you can put all the frozen broth cubes in a freezer ziplock type baggie- toss one or two into dishes calling for added broth).

Can be seasoned to taste and served as a broth or add veggies for a delicious, healthy soup.

* If freezing in jars; be sure to NOT have lid screwed on tight and leave about 1-2 inches at the top for expansion as it freezes. Once it’s frozen, then go back and tighten the lid.

cartoon-bone

Making Beef Bone Broth

I like to take the bone (one works well), roast it in a low heat oven (250 degrees) for about 2 hours. Before putting it in the oven, I’ll slice an onion in thick slices, put some coconut oil in the bottom of a pyrex pan and arrange the onions in it, and then I set the bone on top of the onions. I call it “done” when the onions are browned but not burnt which takes about 1 3/4 – 2 hours.

Then I put all the roasted onions and the beef bone into a deep pan with water and simmer for about 3-5 hours.

Ingredients (into the deep pot of water):

  • Organic, grass-fed long marrow or knuckle beef bones
  • Optional: add onions, garlic, and celery if desired for more flavor
  • Clean filtered water to cover (1/2 gallon or so to start)

Directions:

  1. Put it all in a deep pot on low heat for approximately 3-5 more hours, checking to be sure the water/broth level is at least covering the bone(s)… about 3/4 full.
  2. Remove bones and put broth in jars. Keeps in the fridge about 5-6 days.

 

Alternately, if you don’t have a lot of time to watch over this process:

  1. Skip the roasting part, and put it all into a crockpot on the high setting overnight or when you head out for work in the morning. Be sure to have the water level at about 3/4 full. You can add onion, celery for making a soup base.

TIP: You can let it cool and freeze portions in quart or pint sized jars*, OR you can freeze in ice cube trays (once frozen you can put all the frozen broth cubes in a freezer ziplock type baggie- toss one or two into dishes calling for added broth).

* If freezing in jars; be sure to NOT have lid screwed on tight and leave about 1-2 inches at the top for expansion as it freezes. Once it’s frozen, then go back and tighten the lid.

Can be seasoned to taste and served as a broth or add veggies for a delicious, healthy soup.